13th July 2018, Volume 131 Number 1478

Phillipa Malpas

The ability to successfully transplant organs has restored to health many patients who would have faced an early, inevitable death.1 High success and survival rates have fuelled the demand for…

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Summary

In this paper, I cast an ethical lens over the situation of New Zealand patients travelling to China for an organ transplant, given evidence that China continues to take organs from executed prisoners of conscience. I consider some of the challenges facing health professionals involved in providing medical care to such patients, and propose some recommendations. I hope that this paper may start an informed conversation about this complex issue.

Abstract

In this viewpoint article we consider the situation of organ procurement from China, and address some of the ethical aspects arising for health professionals when New Zealand transplant patients contemplate traveling to China for an organ. We also consider some of the challenges facing health professionals involved in providing care to such patients.

Author Information

Phillipa Malpas, Associate Professor in Clinical Medical Ethics, Department of Psychological Medicine, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland.

Acknowledgements

I would like to thank the two NZMJ reviewers for their careful and insightful comments. Changes made to the paper in light of their reviews have improved the paper significantly.

Correspondence

Dr Phillipa Malpas, Associate Professor in Clinical Medical Ethics, Department of Psychological Medicine, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland.

Correspondence Email

p.malpas@auckland.ac.nz

Competing Interests

Phillipa Malpas is a member of the group, End Transplant Abuse in China (ETAC).

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