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Open letter to: The Council of Medical Colleges in New Zealand; all New Zealand medical colleges; all specialist medial associations; The New Zealand Medical Association; The Association of Salaried Medial Specialists; The New Zealand Tertiary Education Union; The New Zealand Resident Doctors’ Association.

Recorded human history has not followed a linear course. Nodal points of significant change have occurred, when the collective human consciousness has been focused by sudden positively progressive or devastatingly destructive events. It is abundantly clear that such a nodal point has been reached by the current world crisis precipitated by the COVID-19 pandemic.

We all appreciate the world has been getting into an increasing mess for years, with no plans for a more hopeful future.1 Now, however, from many national and international sources come the strong feelings that the time is ripe for a sea-change.2–5 It is vital that this sentiment is harnessed for positive change; the window of opportunity might be short lived. It should not be allowed to ebb away, like the Arab Spring, which failed because of no clear plan for a better way forward.

We propose that the New Zealand medical profession, through its representative bodies, should show leadership by using our collective efforts to promote obviously necessary social change, first by agreeing among ourselves, then engaging with doctors in other countries to do the same. Our purpose should not be politically driven but should be about a reawakening of the spirit of caring for our whole natural world, our communities and our patients. And our reasons for action should be based on our concerns for the inter-connected future of all of these. The world needs a new story of hope, cooperation and progress.6

If you agree with us, an urgent conference of all the listed New Zealand representative bodies is needed to define and sponsor an international action plan. Are you all going to act now?

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Phil Bagshaw, Chair, General Surgery, Canterbury Charity Hospital Trust, Christchurch; Sue Bagshaw, Senior Clinical Lecturer, Paediatrics, University of Otago, Christchurch.

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Prof Phil Bagshaw, Chair, General Surgery, Canterbury Charity Hospital Trust, Christchurch 8543.

Correspondence Email

philipfbagshaw@gmail.com

Competing Interests

Nil.

1. Monbiot G. How did we get into this mess? 2017. www.versobooks.com

2. Nial T. Coronavirus: Could the pandemic help us find good new ways to live? Stuff. 23rd March 2020. http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/coronavirus/120471462/coronavirus-will-we-find-good-new-ways-to-lead-our-lives

3. Mair S. What will the world be like after coronavirus? Four possible futures. The Conversation. 30th March 2020. http://theconversation.com/what-will-the-world-be-like-after-coronavirus-four-possible-futures-134085

4. Jones O. The UK will change after coronavirus. But we have to fight to make it a change for the better. The Guardian. 2nd April 2020. http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/apr/02/after-coronavirus-left-cure-social-ills

5. Bregman R. Now is the moment to change the world. Time Magazine. 18th May 2020; 195(18):34–5.

6. Monbiot G. Out of the wreckage; a new politics for an age of crisis. 2017. www.versobooks.com

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

View Article PDF

Open letter to: The Council of Medical Colleges in New Zealand; all New Zealand medical colleges; all specialist medial associations; The New Zealand Medical Association; The Association of Salaried Medial Specialists; The New Zealand Tertiary Education Union; The New Zealand Resident Doctors’ Association.

Recorded human history has not followed a linear course. Nodal points of significant change have occurred, when the collective human consciousness has been focused by sudden positively progressive or devastatingly destructive events. It is abundantly clear that such a nodal point has been reached by the current world crisis precipitated by the COVID-19 pandemic.

We all appreciate the world has been getting into an increasing mess for years, with no plans for a more hopeful future.1 Now, however, from many national and international sources come the strong feelings that the time is ripe for a sea-change.2–5 It is vital that this sentiment is harnessed for positive change; the window of opportunity might be short lived. It should not be allowed to ebb away, like the Arab Spring, which failed because of no clear plan for a better way forward.

We propose that the New Zealand medical profession, through its representative bodies, should show leadership by using our collective efforts to promote obviously necessary social change, first by agreeing among ourselves, then engaging with doctors in other countries to do the same. Our purpose should not be politically driven but should be about a reawakening of the spirit of caring for our whole natural world, our communities and our patients. And our reasons for action should be based on our concerns for the inter-connected future of all of these. The world needs a new story of hope, cooperation and progress.6

If you agree with us, an urgent conference of all the listed New Zealand representative bodies is needed to define and sponsor an international action plan. Are you all going to act now?

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Phil Bagshaw, Chair, General Surgery, Canterbury Charity Hospital Trust, Christchurch; Sue Bagshaw, Senior Clinical Lecturer, Paediatrics, University of Otago, Christchurch.

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Prof Phil Bagshaw, Chair, General Surgery, Canterbury Charity Hospital Trust, Christchurch 8543.

Correspondence Email

philipfbagshaw@gmail.com

Competing Interests

Nil.

1. Monbiot G. How did we get into this mess? 2017. www.versobooks.com

2. Nial T. Coronavirus: Could the pandemic help us find good new ways to live? Stuff. 23rd March 2020. http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/coronavirus/120471462/coronavirus-will-we-find-good-new-ways-to-lead-our-lives

3. Mair S. What will the world be like after coronavirus? Four possible futures. The Conversation. 30th March 2020. http://theconversation.com/what-will-the-world-be-like-after-coronavirus-four-possible-futures-134085

4. Jones O. The UK will change after coronavirus. But we have to fight to make it a change for the better. The Guardian. 2nd April 2020. http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/apr/02/after-coronavirus-left-cure-social-ills

5. Bregman R. Now is the moment to change the world. Time Magazine. 18th May 2020; 195(18):34–5.

6. Monbiot G. Out of the wreckage; a new politics for an age of crisis. 2017. www.versobooks.com

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

View Article PDF

Open letter to: The Council of Medical Colleges in New Zealand; all New Zealand medical colleges; all specialist medial associations; The New Zealand Medical Association; The Association of Salaried Medial Specialists; The New Zealand Tertiary Education Union; The New Zealand Resident Doctors’ Association.

Recorded human history has not followed a linear course. Nodal points of significant change have occurred, when the collective human consciousness has been focused by sudden positively progressive or devastatingly destructive events. It is abundantly clear that such a nodal point has been reached by the current world crisis precipitated by the COVID-19 pandemic.

We all appreciate the world has been getting into an increasing mess for years, with no plans for a more hopeful future.1 Now, however, from many national and international sources come the strong feelings that the time is ripe for a sea-change.2–5 It is vital that this sentiment is harnessed for positive change; the window of opportunity might be short lived. It should not be allowed to ebb away, like the Arab Spring, which failed because of no clear plan for a better way forward.

We propose that the New Zealand medical profession, through its representative bodies, should show leadership by using our collective efforts to promote obviously necessary social change, first by agreeing among ourselves, then engaging with doctors in other countries to do the same. Our purpose should not be politically driven but should be about a reawakening of the spirit of caring for our whole natural world, our communities and our patients. And our reasons for action should be based on our concerns for the inter-connected future of all of these. The world needs a new story of hope, cooperation and progress.6

If you agree with us, an urgent conference of all the listed New Zealand representative bodies is needed to define and sponsor an international action plan. Are you all going to act now?

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Phil Bagshaw, Chair, General Surgery, Canterbury Charity Hospital Trust, Christchurch; Sue Bagshaw, Senior Clinical Lecturer, Paediatrics, University of Otago, Christchurch.

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Prof Phil Bagshaw, Chair, General Surgery, Canterbury Charity Hospital Trust, Christchurch 8543.

Correspondence Email

philipfbagshaw@gmail.com

Competing Interests

Nil.

1. Monbiot G. How did we get into this mess? 2017. www.versobooks.com

2. Nial T. Coronavirus: Could the pandemic help us find good new ways to live? Stuff. 23rd March 2020. http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/coronavirus/120471462/coronavirus-will-we-find-good-new-ways-to-lead-our-lives

3. Mair S. What will the world be like after coronavirus? Four possible futures. The Conversation. 30th March 2020. http://theconversation.com/what-will-the-world-be-like-after-coronavirus-four-possible-futures-134085

4. Jones O. The UK will change after coronavirus. But we have to fight to make it a change for the better. The Guardian. 2nd April 2020. http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/apr/02/after-coronavirus-left-cure-social-ills

5. Bregman R. Now is the moment to change the world. Time Magazine. 18th May 2020; 195(18):34–5.

6. Monbiot G. Out of the wreckage; a new politics for an age of crisis. 2017. www.versobooks.com

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

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