View Article PDF

c

First edition. Published by The South African Society of Travel Medicine (SASTM) and The International Association of Medical Assistance to travellers (IAMAT), 2016. ISBN 978-0-620-72125-7. Soft covered; contains 129 pages; 15 chapters.

When I found this book was returned from the initial reviewer without a review from the person who had “volunteered” to review it, I thought that I might well learn something to help myself as a frequent traveller, being not as young as I once was. I was disappointed to find that I actually made the criteria for the older traveller, and even more disappointed to read that according to the Erik Erikson eight stages of life span, I am on the final stage!

The book points out that more and more people are traveling, especially older people. People travel for all sorts of reasons, and a lot of older people are traveling for pleasure and to see family, as they have the time, the health and the money in retirement.

The book itself is written for doctors advising people about travel preparations, not for people who are traveling themselves. As such it may well be useful for GPs and doctors who have such an interest in travel medicine. It essentially covers a range of issues that might affect travellers such as acute respiratory and diarrheal illness, impact of traveling with early dementia, as well as the issues of stress and anxiety while traveling. It briefly also covers issues with musculoskeletal arches and pains and DVT prophylaxis. A large part focuses on the risk versus benefits in the older patients of immunisation for travel.

It is easy to read with its plain language and expands into the issues of aging physiology, which is interesting enough.

It is a multiauthor book (15 authors) with the authors being predominately from South Africa, but some from Australia, US, UK and Europe. As with most multi-authors books there is some repetition and overlap between chapters, however at least the overlap is consistent.

It is a book that one might read once and not keep for reference, and as such it is an easy and informative read—almost enjoyable.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Frank Frizelle, Department of Surgery, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch.

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Professor Frank Frizelle, Department of Surgery, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch.

Correspondence Email

frank.frizelle@cdhb.health.nz

Competing Interests

Nil.

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

View Article PDF

c

First edition. Published by The South African Society of Travel Medicine (SASTM) and The International Association of Medical Assistance to travellers (IAMAT), 2016. ISBN 978-0-620-72125-7. Soft covered; contains 129 pages; 15 chapters.

When I found this book was returned from the initial reviewer without a review from the person who had “volunteered” to review it, I thought that I might well learn something to help myself as a frequent traveller, being not as young as I once was. I was disappointed to find that I actually made the criteria for the older traveller, and even more disappointed to read that according to the Erik Erikson eight stages of life span, I am on the final stage!

The book points out that more and more people are traveling, especially older people. People travel for all sorts of reasons, and a lot of older people are traveling for pleasure and to see family, as they have the time, the health and the money in retirement.

The book itself is written for doctors advising people about travel preparations, not for people who are traveling themselves. As such it may well be useful for GPs and doctors who have such an interest in travel medicine. It essentially covers a range of issues that might affect travellers such as acute respiratory and diarrheal illness, impact of traveling with early dementia, as well as the issues of stress and anxiety while traveling. It briefly also covers issues with musculoskeletal arches and pains and DVT prophylaxis. A large part focuses on the risk versus benefits in the older patients of immunisation for travel.

It is easy to read with its plain language and expands into the issues of aging physiology, which is interesting enough.

It is a multiauthor book (15 authors) with the authors being predominately from South Africa, but some from Australia, US, UK and Europe. As with most multi-authors books there is some repetition and overlap between chapters, however at least the overlap is consistent.

It is a book that one might read once and not keep for reference, and as such it is an easy and informative read—almost enjoyable.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Frank Frizelle, Department of Surgery, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch.

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Professor Frank Frizelle, Department of Surgery, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch.

Correspondence Email

frank.frizelle@cdhb.health.nz

Competing Interests

Nil.

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

View Article PDF

c

First edition. Published by The South African Society of Travel Medicine (SASTM) and The International Association of Medical Assistance to travellers (IAMAT), 2016. ISBN 978-0-620-72125-7. Soft covered; contains 129 pages; 15 chapters.

When I found this book was returned from the initial reviewer without a review from the person who had “volunteered” to review it, I thought that I might well learn something to help myself as a frequent traveller, being not as young as I once was. I was disappointed to find that I actually made the criteria for the older traveller, and even more disappointed to read that according to the Erik Erikson eight stages of life span, I am on the final stage!

The book points out that more and more people are traveling, especially older people. People travel for all sorts of reasons, and a lot of older people are traveling for pleasure and to see family, as they have the time, the health and the money in retirement.

The book itself is written for doctors advising people about travel preparations, not for people who are traveling themselves. As such it may well be useful for GPs and doctors who have such an interest in travel medicine. It essentially covers a range of issues that might affect travellers such as acute respiratory and diarrheal illness, impact of traveling with early dementia, as well as the issues of stress and anxiety while traveling. It briefly also covers issues with musculoskeletal arches and pains and DVT prophylaxis. A large part focuses on the risk versus benefits in the older patients of immunisation for travel.

It is easy to read with its plain language and expands into the issues of aging physiology, which is interesting enough.

It is a multiauthor book (15 authors) with the authors being predominately from South Africa, but some from Australia, US, UK and Europe. As with most multi-authors books there is some repetition and overlap between chapters, however at least the overlap is consistent.

It is a book that one might read once and not keep for reference, and as such it is an easy and informative read—almost enjoyable.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Frank Frizelle, Department of Surgery, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch.

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Professor Frank Frizelle, Department of Surgery, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch.

Correspondence Email

frank.frizelle@cdhb.health.nz

Competing Interests

Nil.

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

Subscriber Content

The full contents of this pages only available to subscribers.

LOGINSUBSCRIBE