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Hamlets Soliloquy. A Fancy Morgue Sketch. The Coroner: To be or not to be? that is the question. (Observer, 24 August 1912). Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/27572970 This subject has been well treated by Dr Wilson, of the Mayo Clinic. Probably in no department is there more scope for general education than in this important one. In New Zealand today, if any of our valuable stock die, or an epidemic effects our sheep or horses, post mortem examinations are made and the result communicated to the owners. Surely our own children are as valuable an asset as our cattle? In this, as in other serious diseases, the medical profession will make no headway until it convinces the public of the value of expert bacteriological or pathological findings. In cancer, up to the present, we have unfortunately no bacteriology, but through the pathologist alone can reliable statistics, reliable diagnosis in early cases, and the true story in neglected cases be accurately unfolded. The opinion of a pathologist should at once be available on the nature of any growth removed at the time of operation, and in the case of death, both relatives and practitioners should welcome a post mortem examination, for the invaluable information that both may obtain. The fact that the public do not recognise the value of post mortem examinations, and consequently ref use permission when one is requested, is largely the fault of the profession. A concise and straightforward report by a skilled pathologist should be handed in writing to the next-of-kin after any such examination. It is not right that the physician alone should gain knowledge by such examination. It is of great importance that a man should know what really caused the death of his child. Moreover, no greater stimulus is possible to a sound clinical work than the verification by post mortem findings. The medical profession is, or ought to be, the guardian of the public health. Anything that tends towards the greater efficiency of the profession should be welcomed by the public if it is mindful of its dearest asset good health. The pathologist is, or ought to be, the auditor of medical accuracy. In conclusion, I make the following suggestion: That the Council of the NZ Branch of the British Medical Association make arrangements for convening a cancer conference, to which be invited the heads of the Health Department, Veterinary Department, chairman and members of Charitable Aid Boards, and all members of the profession and public interested in the subject. Valuable information, both to the profession and to the public, should thus be obtained, and uniform methods of dealing with the disease established throughout the Dominion. Similar conferences have frequently been held on the subject of tuberculosis with excellent results, and I believe that the cancer problem should not present the same difficulties today that the consumption problem did ten years ago, provided that the full forces of education and scientific investigation are brought to bear on the subject in an organised manner throughout the Dominion. NZMJ December 1915

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

View Article PDF

Hamlets Soliloquy. A Fancy Morgue Sketch. The Coroner: To be or not to be? that is the question. (Observer, 24 August 1912). Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/27572970 This subject has been well treated by Dr Wilson, of the Mayo Clinic. Probably in no department is there more scope for general education than in this important one. In New Zealand today, if any of our valuable stock die, or an epidemic effects our sheep or horses, post mortem examinations are made and the result communicated to the owners. Surely our own children are as valuable an asset as our cattle? In this, as in other serious diseases, the medical profession will make no headway until it convinces the public of the value of expert bacteriological or pathological findings. In cancer, up to the present, we have unfortunately no bacteriology, but through the pathologist alone can reliable statistics, reliable diagnosis in early cases, and the true story in neglected cases be accurately unfolded. The opinion of a pathologist should at once be available on the nature of any growth removed at the time of operation, and in the case of death, both relatives and practitioners should welcome a post mortem examination, for the invaluable information that both may obtain. The fact that the public do not recognise the value of post mortem examinations, and consequently ref use permission when one is requested, is largely the fault of the profession. A concise and straightforward report by a skilled pathologist should be handed in writing to the next-of-kin after any such examination. It is not right that the physician alone should gain knowledge by such examination. It is of great importance that a man should know what really caused the death of his child. Moreover, no greater stimulus is possible to a sound clinical work than the verification by post mortem findings. The medical profession is, or ought to be, the guardian of the public health. Anything that tends towards the greater efficiency of the profession should be welcomed by the public if it is mindful of its dearest asset good health. The pathologist is, or ought to be, the auditor of medical accuracy. In conclusion, I make the following suggestion: That the Council of the NZ Branch of the British Medical Association make arrangements for convening a cancer conference, to which be invited the heads of the Health Department, Veterinary Department, chairman and members of Charitable Aid Boards, and all members of the profession and public interested in the subject. Valuable information, both to the profession and to the public, should thus be obtained, and uniform methods of dealing with the disease established throughout the Dominion. Similar conferences have frequently been held on the subject of tuberculosis with excellent results, and I believe that the cancer problem should not present the same difficulties today that the consumption problem did ten years ago, provided that the full forces of education and scientific investigation are brought to bear on the subject in an organised manner throughout the Dominion. NZMJ December 1915

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

View Article PDF

Hamlets Soliloquy. A Fancy Morgue Sketch. The Coroner: To be or not to be? that is the question. (Observer, 24 August 1912). Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/27572970 This subject has been well treated by Dr Wilson, of the Mayo Clinic. Probably in no department is there more scope for general education than in this important one. In New Zealand today, if any of our valuable stock die, or an epidemic effects our sheep or horses, post mortem examinations are made and the result communicated to the owners. Surely our own children are as valuable an asset as our cattle? In this, as in other serious diseases, the medical profession will make no headway until it convinces the public of the value of expert bacteriological or pathological findings. In cancer, up to the present, we have unfortunately no bacteriology, but through the pathologist alone can reliable statistics, reliable diagnosis in early cases, and the true story in neglected cases be accurately unfolded. The opinion of a pathologist should at once be available on the nature of any growth removed at the time of operation, and in the case of death, both relatives and practitioners should welcome a post mortem examination, for the invaluable information that both may obtain. The fact that the public do not recognise the value of post mortem examinations, and consequently ref use permission when one is requested, is largely the fault of the profession. A concise and straightforward report by a skilled pathologist should be handed in writing to the next-of-kin after any such examination. It is not right that the physician alone should gain knowledge by such examination. It is of great importance that a man should know what really caused the death of his child. Moreover, no greater stimulus is possible to a sound clinical work than the verification by post mortem findings. The medical profession is, or ought to be, the guardian of the public health. Anything that tends towards the greater efficiency of the profession should be welcomed by the public if it is mindful of its dearest asset good health. The pathologist is, or ought to be, the auditor of medical accuracy. In conclusion, I make the following suggestion: That the Council of the NZ Branch of the British Medical Association make arrangements for convening a cancer conference, to which be invited the heads of the Health Department, Veterinary Department, chairman and members of Charitable Aid Boards, and all members of the profession and public interested in the subject. Valuable information, both to the profession and to the public, should thus be obtained, and uniform methods of dealing with the disease established throughout the Dominion. Similar conferences have frequently been held on the subject of tuberculosis with excellent results, and I believe that the cancer problem should not present the same difficulties today that the consumption problem did ten years ago, provided that the full forces of education and scientific investigation are brought to bear on the subject in an organised manner throughout the Dominion. NZMJ December 1915

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

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