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October 1920

MR. L. M. Isitt, M.P., is angry at the comments made in the last number of this Journal on his statements in Parliament in the debate on the Masseurs Registration Bill, and writes to the Editor in terms so undignified, unrestrained, and intemperate that his letter is quite unsuited to the pages of this Journal. He adheres to his story about the three doctors who could not tell measles from appendicitis (if it had been erysipelas and a bee-sting it would have been much more difficult) and adds circumstantially that they are prominent doctors, and they said that if they were not allowed to operate on the child within twenty-four hours the child’s fate would be upon the mother’s head. Mr. Isitt states that our editorial and verses are suited to the pages of Norton’s “Truth.” It may be so, but we do not read this publication, and Mr. Isitt has the advantage of us there; but we are sure that Mr. Isitt’s story is not suitable for publication except to the marines. Their reputed credulity may not prevent them from at all events seeing a joke.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

View Article PDF

October 1920

MR. L. M. Isitt, M.P., is angry at the comments made in the last number of this Journal on his statements in Parliament in the debate on the Masseurs Registration Bill, and writes to the Editor in terms so undignified, unrestrained, and intemperate that his letter is quite unsuited to the pages of this Journal. He adheres to his story about the three doctors who could not tell measles from appendicitis (if it had been erysipelas and a bee-sting it would have been much more difficult) and adds circumstantially that they are prominent doctors, and they said that if they were not allowed to operate on the child within twenty-four hours the child’s fate would be upon the mother’s head. Mr. Isitt states that our editorial and verses are suited to the pages of Norton’s “Truth.” It may be so, but we do not read this publication, and Mr. Isitt has the advantage of us there; but we are sure that Mr. Isitt’s story is not suitable for publication except to the marines. Their reputed credulity may not prevent them from at all events seeing a joke.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

View Article PDF

October 1920

MR. L. M. Isitt, M.P., is angry at the comments made in the last number of this Journal on his statements in Parliament in the debate on the Masseurs Registration Bill, and writes to the Editor in terms so undignified, unrestrained, and intemperate that his letter is quite unsuited to the pages of this Journal. He adheres to his story about the three doctors who could not tell measles from appendicitis (if it had been erysipelas and a bee-sting it would have been much more difficult) and adds circumstantially that they are prominent doctors, and they said that if they were not allowed to operate on the child within twenty-four hours the child’s fate would be upon the mother’s head. Mr. Isitt states that our editorial and verses are suited to the pages of Norton’s “Truth.” It may be so, but we do not read this publication, and Mr. Isitt has the advantage of us there; but we are sure that Mr. Isitt’s story is not suitable for publication except to the marines. Their reputed credulity may not prevent them from at all events seeing a joke.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

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