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Clinical A patient admitted to the ICU required a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC).Chest X-ray (CXR) demonstrated the PICC taking an unusual left parasternal course with the tip posterior to the left ventricle (Figure 1). Blood gas was consistent with venous blood.Figure 1. CXR demonstrating the unusual left parasternal position of the PICC (black arrows) Would you use this PICC line?Answer

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Abdel Rahman Lataifeh, Khaled R Khasawneh. Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Khaled R Khasawneh, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham St, Slot 555, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA. Fax: +1 (0)501 6867893

Correspondence Email

Krkhasawneh@uams.edu

Competing Interests

1. Demos TC, Posniak HV, Pierce KL, et al. Venous anomalies of the thorax. AJR Am J Roentgenol 2004;182:1139-1150.2. Couvreur T, Ghaye B. Left superior vena cava. In Integrated Cardiothoracic Imaging with MDCT from Medical Radiology. Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology series. 1st edition. Edited by R\u00e9my-Jardin M, R\u00e9my J. Berlin \u00b7 Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag; 2009:289-305. 3. Povoski SP, Khabiri H. Persistent left superior vena cava: Review of the literature, clinical implications, and relevance of alterations in thoracic central venous anatomy as pertaining to the general principles of central venous access device placement and venography in cancer patients. World J Surg Oncol. 2011;9:173.

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
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View Article PDF

Clinical A patient admitted to the ICU required a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC).Chest X-ray (CXR) demonstrated the PICC taking an unusual left parasternal course with the tip posterior to the left ventricle (Figure 1). Blood gas was consistent with venous blood.Figure 1. CXR demonstrating the unusual left parasternal position of the PICC (black arrows) Would you use this PICC line?Answer

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Abdel Rahman Lataifeh, Khaled R Khasawneh. Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Khaled R Khasawneh, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham St, Slot 555, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA. Fax: +1 (0)501 6867893

Correspondence Email

Krkhasawneh@uams.edu

Competing Interests

1. Demos TC, Posniak HV, Pierce KL, et al. Venous anomalies of the thorax. AJR Am J Roentgenol 2004;182:1139-1150.2. Couvreur T, Ghaye B. Left superior vena cava. In Integrated Cardiothoracic Imaging with MDCT from Medical Radiology. Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology series. 1st edition. Edited by R\u00e9my-Jardin M, R\u00e9my J. Berlin \u00b7 Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag; 2009:289-305. 3. Povoski SP, Khabiri H. Persistent left superior vena cava: Review of the literature, clinical implications, and relevance of alterations in thoracic central venous anatomy as pertaining to the general principles of central venous access device placement and venography in cancer patients. World J Surg Oncol. 2011;9:173.

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

View Article PDF

Clinical A patient admitted to the ICU required a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC).Chest X-ray (CXR) demonstrated the PICC taking an unusual left parasternal course with the tip posterior to the left ventricle (Figure 1). Blood gas was consistent with venous blood.Figure 1. CXR demonstrating the unusual left parasternal position of the PICC (black arrows) Would you use this PICC line?Answer

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Abdel Rahman Lataifeh, Khaled R Khasawneh. Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Khaled R Khasawneh, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham St, Slot 555, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA. Fax: +1 (0)501 6867893

Correspondence Email

Krkhasawneh@uams.edu

Competing Interests

1. Demos TC, Posniak HV, Pierce KL, et al. Venous anomalies of the thorax. AJR Am J Roentgenol 2004;182:1139-1150.2. Couvreur T, Ghaye B. Left superior vena cava. In Integrated Cardiothoracic Imaging with MDCT from Medical Radiology. Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology series. 1st edition. Edited by R\u00e9my-Jardin M, R\u00e9my J. Berlin \u00b7 Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag; 2009:289-305. 3. Povoski SP, Khabiri H. Persistent left superior vena cava: Review of the literature, clinical implications, and relevance of alterations in thoracic central venous anatomy as pertaining to the general principles of central venous access device placement and venography in cancer patients. World J Surg Oncol. 2011;9:173.

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

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