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c

19 October 1920–15 July 2017

MB, ChB University of Otago 1947

Campbell Hockin was born in Rotorua where his father Dr Munro Hockin worked at King Edward Memorial Hospital. He was educated initially at Kaponga School then Southwell School in Hamilton when his father became medical superintendent of Waikato Hospital in 1928. Campbell’s secondary schooling was at Wanganui Collegiate where he excelled at cricket and rugby.

After graduating from Otago Medical School in 1947, Campbell returned to Waikato Hospital as a house surgeon where he met and married registered nurse, Audrey Eaddy and joined his friend Dick Langley in Winton, Southland in general practice. Cam and Audrey’s honeymoon was the trip south to begin married life together and meet the demands of a busy rural practice.

In his time in Winton, Campbell developed the reputation of a dedicated, talented, compassionate practitioner, earning the respect of both his patients and his colleagues. The post-war years saw a huge increase in the numbers of babies being born and Campbell developed his obstetric skills over these busy years, delivering over 2,000 babies. Winton had its own small maternity hospital and Campbell fondly recalled his experiences there and the wonderful professional support of Sister Thompson who was in charge. In 1956, Campbell was awarded the Doris Gordon Scholarship and took his growing family to Auckland for a year where he further honed his obstetric skills (under the guidance of Harvey Carey) and took his considerable experience back to Winton.

After the departure of Dick to Napier, Campbell was joined in practice by John O’Hagan and in later years, Lindsay Quennell, Terry Wilson and Jim Devane. These doctors acknowledge the importance of Campbell’s teachings, his wisdom and ability in their own continuing medical education. The Winton practice also became a training centre for students wishing to become GPs and a meeting place for other rural doctors who were able to exchange ideas and experiences. Medical referrals were to Kew Hospital in Invercargill 30km away, and Campbell often drove patients there himself if the occasion warranted it. It also gave him the excuse to drive very fast and indulge his love of cars. At this time, he also earned his private pilot’s licence. He had inherited a love of flying from his father who also held a licence—a love he has passed on to his son and grandson.

In 1972, after a coronary, Campbell relocated to Rotorua to become senior casualty officer there. After triple bypass surgery in 1976, Campbell’s health settled and indeed he often wondered if he was the longest surviving patient of such a procedure. His practical nature, his skill and general love of medicine were always evident and he thrived on the demands of a busy emergency department. He always acknowledged the support and skills of those he worked with and many young doctors and nurses sought his wise counsel and accordingly acknowledged the role he played in their medical education. After retiring in the 1980s, Campbell continued to work as a GP locum in Rotorua and enjoyed the contact with patients into his seventies.

Campbell was a very modest man, without ego or artifice. He was old-fashioned in the best possible way. He valued good manners and he was a compassionate doctor who treated everyone with respect and dignity. He retained his love and interest in sport and was a member of the Otago University Light Blues Association. He retained a quick, agile mind to the end and continued to enjoy the company of friends and family after the death of his beloved wife Audrey in 2014. He was a devoted family man and was enormously proud of all their achievements.

He is survived by his four children—Rosemary, Christine, Munro and Penelope, 14 grand-children and four great-grandchildren.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Christine Revell, BA, DipTchg, Dr Hockin's daughter.

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

View Article PDF

c

19 October 1920–15 July 2017

MB, ChB University of Otago 1947

Campbell Hockin was born in Rotorua where his father Dr Munro Hockin worked at King Edward Memorial Hospital. He was educated initially at Kaponga School then Southwell School in Hamilton when his father became medical superintendent of Waikato Hospital in 1928. Campbell’s secondary schooling was at Wanganui Collegiate where he excelled at cricket and rugby.

After graduating from Otago Medical School in 1947, Campbell returned to Waikato Hospital as a house surgeon where he met and married registered nurse, Audrey Eaddy and joined his friend Dick Langley in Winton, Southland in general practice. Cam and Audrey’s honeymoon was the trip south to begin married life together and meet the demands of a busy rural practice.

In his time in Winton, Campbell developed the reputation of a dedicated, talented, compassionate practitioner, earning the respect of both his patients and his colleagues. The post-war years saw a huge increase in the numbers of babies being born and Campbell developed his obstetric skills over these busy years, delivering over 2,000 babies. Winton had its own small maternity hospital and Campbell fondly recalled his experiences there and the wonderful professional support of Sister Thompson who was in charge. In 1956, Campbell was awarded the Doris Gordon Scholarship and took his growing family to Auckland for a year where he further honed his obstetric skills (under the guidance of Harvey Carey) and took his considerable experience back to Winton.

After the departure of Dick to Napier, Campbell was joined in practice by John O’Hagan and in later years, Lindsay Quennell, Terry Wilson and Jim Devane. These doctors acknowledge the importance of Campbell’s teachings, his wisdom and ability in their own continuing medical education. The Winton practice also became a training centre for students wishing to become GPs and a meeting place for other rural doctors who were able to exchange ideas and experiences. Medical referrals were to Kew Hospital in Invercargill 30km away, and Campbell often drove patients there himself if the occasion warranted it. It also gave him the excuse to drive very fast and indulge his love of cars. At this time, he also earned his private pilot’s licence. He had inherited a love of flying from his father who also held a licence—a love he has passed on to his son and grandson.

In 1972, after a coronary, Campbell relocated to Rotorua to become senior casualty officer there. After triple bypass surgery in 1976, Campbell’s health settled and indeed he often wondered if he was the longest surviving patient of such a procedure. His practical nature, his skill and general love of medicine were always evident and he thrived on the demands of a busy emergency department. He always acknowledged the support and skills of those he worked with and many young doctors and nurses sought his wise counsel and accordingly acknowledged the role he played in their medical education. After retiring in the 1980s, Campbell continued to work as a GP locum in Rotorua and enjoyed the contact with patients into his seventies.

Campbell was a very modest man, without ego or artifice. He was old-fashioned in the best possible way. He valued good manners and he was a compassionate doctor who treated everyone with respect and dignity. He retained his love and interest in sport and was a member of the Otago University Light Blues Association. He retained a quick, agile mind to the end and continued to enjoy the company of friends and family after the death of his beloved wife Audrey in 2014. He was a devoted family man and was enormously proud of all their achievements.

He is survived by his four children—Rosemary, Christine, Munro and Penelope, 14 grand-children and four great-grandchildren.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Christine Revell, BA, DipTchg, Dr Hockin's daughter.

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

View Article PDF

c

19 October 1920–15 July 2017

MB, ChB University of Otago 1947

Campbell Hockin was born in Rotorua where his father Dr Munro Hockin worked at King Edward Memorial Hospital. He was educated initially at Kaponga School then Southwell School in Hamilton when his father became medical superintendent of Waikato Hospital in 1928. Campbell’s secondary schooling was at Wanganui Collegiate where he excelled at cricket and rugby.

After graduating from Otago Medical School in 1947, Campbell returned to Waikato Hospital as a house surgeon where he met and married registered nurse, Audrey Eaddy and joined his friend Dick Langley in Winton, Southland in general practice. Cam and Audrey’s honeymoon was the trip south to begin married life together and meet the demands of a busy rural practice.

In his time in Winton, Campbell developed the reputation of a dedicated, talented, compassionate practitioner, earning the respect of both his patients and his colleagues. The post-war years saw a huge increase in the numbers of babies being born and Campbell developed his obstetric skills over these busy years, delivering over 2,000 babies. Winton had its own small maternity hospital and Campbell fondly recalled his experiences there and the wonderful professional support of Sister Thompson who was in charge. In 1956, Campbell was awarded the Doris Gordon Scholarship and took his growing family to Auckland for a year where he further honed his obstetric skills (under the guidance of Harvey Carey) and took his considerable experience back to Winton.

After the departure of Dick to Napier, Campbell was joined in practice by John O’Hagan and in later years, Lindsay Quennell, Terry Wilson and Jim Devane. These doctors acknowledge the importance of Campbell’s teachings, his wisdom and ability in their own continuing medical education. The Winton practice also became a training centre for students wishing to become GPs and a meeting place for other rural doctors who were able to exchange ideas and experiences. Medical referrals were to Kew Hospital in Invercargill 30km away, and Campbell often drove patients there himself if the occasion warranted it. It also gave him the excuse to drive very fast and indulge his love of cars. At this time, he also earned his private pilot’s licence. He had inherited a love of flying from his father who also held a licence—a love he has passed on to his son and grandson.

In 1972, after a coronary, Campbell relocated to Rotorua to become senior casualty officer there. After triple bypass surgery in 1976, Campbell’s health settled and indeed he often wondered if he was the longest surviving patient of such a procedure. His practical nature, his skill and general love of medicine were always evident and he thrived on the demands of a busy emergency department. He always acknowledged the support and skills of those he worked with and many young doctors and nurses sought his wise counsel and accordingly acknowledged the role he played in their medical education. After retiring in the 1980s, Campbell continued to work as a GP locum in Rotorua and enjoyed the contact with patients into his seventies.

Campbell was a very modest man, without ego or artifice. He was old-fashioned in the best possible way. He valued good manners and he was a compassionate doctor who treated everyone with respect and dignity. He retained his love and interest in sport and was a member of the Otago University Light Blues Association. He retained a quick, agile mind to the end and continued to enjoy the company of friends and family after the death of his beloved wife Audrey in 2014. He was a devoted family man and was enormously proud of all their achievements.

He is survived by his four children—Rosemary, Christine, Munro and Penelope, 14 grand-children and four great-grandchildren.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Christine Revell, BA, DipTchg, Dr Hockin's daughter.

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

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