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8 July 1943–12 September 2020
MB ChB, DO, FRCS

Dr Tony Morris died unexpectedly on September 12. He had had health issues for some time but his sudden death was unexpected and was a great shock to his family, friends, and in particular the two other founding directors of Eye Institute, Drs Peter Ring and Bruce Hadden.

Tony and his identical twin John, an orthopaedic surgeon living in Queensland, were born in Auckland and educated at St Kentigern College where they excelled scholastically. Both went on to the University of Otago Medical School and graduated in 1966. After two years as a house surgeon, Tony trained in ophthalmic surgery at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London.

Tony returned to Auckland where he initially joined Drs Harold Coop and Lindo Ferguson. In the 1980s he built his own dedicated ophthalmic suite and at around that time he became interested in refractive corneal surgery—an extension of his interest in contact lenses. Peter had similar intentions and they both did their first radial keratotomy procedures in the same week in 1986.

In 1990 Tony, Peter and Bruce together decided that it was time to embark on phaco-emulsification of cataracts, which by then was becoming the preferred technique in the US. Together we persuaded the Mercy Hospital, where we all operated, to purchase the equipment. That was our first learning curve together.

Excimer laser refractive surgery, initially photo-refractive keratectomy (PRK), was developing overseas so Tony and Peter went to a meeting in San Diego in 1992 to view the machine and technique. They were persuaded and ordered a Summit laser on the spot. Returning home, they invited Bruce to join as this was unchartered waters in the ophthalmic community, generating much opprobrium. We featured on the radio and in the press where someone forecast many patients going blind in the future.

Tony’s inspiration was for the three of us to join practices, and to build a dedicated ophthalmic day-stay surgical centre. The building was opened by the Governor-General Dame Cath Tizard on 24 February 1995. Initially we employed 19 staff, and at the time it seemed a huge undertaking for just three of us. Tony’s business skills and vision for the future surpassed ours, but as a trio we all contributed different aspects that gelled into a partnership that worked harmoniously for the next 20 years. By then the partnership had expanded to seven ophthalmologists and space was a premium, so Eye Institute built a larger facility. Tony then felt it was time to retire to make room for further young ophthalmologists.

Tony’s interests outside ophthalmology were wide-ranging. He owned and raced several yachts including “Diamond Knife”, and a big game-fishing launch “Outer Limits”. He owned a boat building business, and he enjoyed scuba diving. Following his marine interests, golfing became a passion. He enjoyed playing with Margaret and they bought a place at Millbrook, near Queenstown. Tony also engaged in several business and property ventures.

Tony was a man of few words, which his patients accepted, and he had a big surgical practice. He was well read and could discuss in depth on a wide range of topics outside his main sphere of interests. He was generous to his staff, taking them to numerous conferences.

Tony’s enduring contributions to New Zealand ophthalmology were taking the lead in cataract surgery techniques, refractive surgery and ambulatory ophthalmic surgery.

Little known, Tony was a huge philanthropist. He established a cancer treatment in New Zealand called Peptide Radionuclide Receptor Therapy used to treat neuro-endocrine tumours. He also funded an endowed Chair, the Antony and Margaret Morris Chair in Translational Cancer Research. Both these huge legacies to the University of Auckland will be of enduring benefit to cancer treatment in our country.

To his two original partners he was a very good friend and colleague. Without Tony’s enterprise we would not have had such interesting and successful careers, and there would not have been an Eye Institute as we know it.

Tony leaves Margaret, his devoted wife of 55 years, their daughter Michelle and son Stephen, and four grandchildren, to whom we extend our sincere condolences.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Written by Peter Ring and Bruce Hadden.

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

View Article PDF

8 July 1943–12 September 2020
MB ChB, DO, FRCS

Dr Tony Morris died unexpectedly on September 12. He had had health issues for some time but his sudden death was unexpected and was a great shock to his family, friends, and in particular the two other founding directors of Eye Institute, Drs Peter Ring and Bruce Hadden.

Tony and his identical twin John, an orthopaedic surgeon living in Queensland, were born in Auckland and educated at St Kentigern College where they excelled scholastically. Both went on to the University of Otago Medical School and graduated in 1966. After two years as a house surgeon, Tony trained in ophthalmic surgery at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London.

Tony returned to Auckland where he initially joined Drs Harold Coop and Lindo Ferguson. In the 1980s he built his own dedicated ophthalmic suite and at around that time he became interested in refractive corneal surgery—an extension of his interest in contact lenses. Peter had similar intentions and they both did their first radial keratotomy procedures in the same week in 1986.

In 1990 Tony, Peter and Bruce together decided that it was time to embark on phaco-emulsification of cataracts, which by then was becoming the preferred technique in the US. Together we persuaded the Mercy Hospital, where we all operated, to purchase the equipment. That was our first learning curve together.

Excimer laser refractive surgery, initially photo-refractive keratectomy (PRK), was developing overseas so Tony and Peter went to a meeting in San Diego in 1992 to view the machine and technique. They were persuaded and ordered a Summit laser on the spot. Returning home, they invited Bruce to join as this was unchartered waters in the ophthalmic community, generating much opprobrium. We featured on the radio and in the press where someone forecast many patients going blind in the future.

Tony’s inspiration was for the three of us to join practices, and to build a dedicated ophthalmic day-stay surgical centre. The building was opened by the Governor-General Dame Cath Tizard on 24 February 1995. Initially we employed 19 staff, and at the time it seemed a huge undertaking for just three of us. Tony’s business skills and vision for the future surpassed ours, but as a trio we all contributed different aspects that gelled into a partnership that worked harmoniously for the next 20 years. By then the partnership had expanded to seven ophthalmologists and space was a premium, so Eye Institute built a larger facility. Tony then felt it was time to retire to make room for further young ophthalmologists.

Tony’s interests outside ophthalmology were wide-ranging. He owned and raced several yachts including “Diamond Knife”, and a big game-fishing launch “Outer Limits”. He owned a boat building business, and he enjoyed scuba diving. Following his marine interests, golfing became a passion. He enjoyed playing with Margaret and they bought a place at Millbrook, near Queenstown. Tony also engaged in several business and property ventures.

Tony was a man of few words, which his patients accepted, and he had a big surgical practice. He was well read and could discuss in depth on a wide range of topics outside his main sphere of interests. He was generous to his staff, taking them to numerous conferences.

Tony’s enduring contributions to New Zealand ophthalmology were taking the lead in cataract surgery techniques, refractive surgery and ambulatory ophthalmic surgery.

Little known, Tony was a huge philanthropist. He established a cancer treatment in New Zealand called Peptide Radionuclide Receptor Therapy used to treat neuro-endocrine tumours. He also funded an endowed Chair, the Antony and Margaret Morris Chair in Translational Cancer Research. Both these huge legacies to the University of Auckland will be of enduring benefit to cancer treatment in our country.

To his two original partners he was a very good friend and colleague. Without Tony’s enterprise we would not have had such interesting and successful careers, and there would not have been an Eye Institute as we know it.

Tony leaves Margaret, his devoted wife of 55 years, their daughter Michelle and son Stephen, and four grandchildren, to whom we extend our sincere condolences.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Written by Peter Ring and Bruce Hadden.

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

View Article PDF

8 July 1943–12 September 2020
MB ChB, DO, FRCS

Dr Tony Morris died unexpectedly on September 12. He had had health issues for some time but his sudden death was unexpected and was a great shock to his family, friends, and in particular the two other founding directors of Eye Institute, Drs Peter Ring and Bruce Hadden.

Tony and his identical twin John, an orthopaedic surgeon living in Queensland, were born in Auckland and educated at St Kentigern College where they excelled scholastically. Both went on to the University of Otago Medical School and graduated in 1966. After two years as a house surgeon, Tony trained in ophthalmic surgery at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London.

Tony returned to Auckland where he initially joined Drs Harold Coop and Lindo Ferguson. In the 1980s he built his own dedicated ophthalmic suite and at around that time he became interested in refractive corneal surgery—an extension of his interest in contact lenses. Peter had similar intentions and they both did their first radial keratotomy procedures in the same week in 1986.

In 1990 Tony, Peter and Bruce together decided that it was time to embark on phaco-emulsification of cataracts, which by then was becoming the preferred technique in the US. Together we persuaded the Mercy Hospital, where we all operated, to purchase the equipment. That was our first learning curve together.

Excimer laser refractive surgery, initially photo-refractive keratectomy (PRK), was developing overseas so Tony and Peter went to a meeting in San Diego in 1992 to view the machine and technique. They were persuaded and ordered a Summit laser on the spot. Returning home, they invited Bruce to join as this was unchartered waters in the ophthalmic community, generating much opprobrium. We featured on the radio and in the press where someone forecast many patients going blind in the future.

Tony’s inspiration was for the three of us to join practices, and to build a dedicated ophthalmic day-stay surgical centre. The building was opened by the Governor-General Dame Cath Tizard on 24 February 1995. Initially we employed 19 staff, and at the time it seemed a huge undertaking for just three of us. Tony’s business skills and vision for the future surpassed ours, but as a trio we all contributed different aspects that gelled into a partnership that worked harmoniously for the next 20 years. By then the partnership had expanded to seven ophthalmologists and space was a premium, so Eye Institute built a larger facility. Tony then felt it was time to retire to make room for further young ophthalmologists.

Tony’s interests outside ophthalmology were wide-ranging. He owned and raced several yachts including “Diamond Knife”, and a big game-fishing launch “Outer Limits”. He owned a boat building business, and he enjoyed scuba diving. Following his marine interests, golfing became a passion. He enjoyed playing with Margaret and they bought a place at Millbrook, near Queenstown. Tony also engaged in several business and property ventures.

Tony was a man of few words, which his patients accepted, and he had a big surgical practice. He was well read and could discuss in depth on a wide range of topics outside his main sphere of interests. He was generous to his staff, taking them to numerous conferences.

Tony’s enduring contributions to New Zealand ophthalmology were taking the lead in cataract surgery techniques, refractive surgery and ambulatory ophthalmic surgery.

Little known, Tony was a huge philanthropist. He established a cancer treatment in New Zealand called Peptide Radionuclide Receptor Therapy used to treat neuro-endocrine tumours. He also funded an endowed Chair, the Antony and Margaret Morris Chair in Translational Cancer Research. Both these huge legacies to the University of Auckland will be of enduring benefit to cancer treatment in our country.

To his two original partners he was a very good friend and colleague. Without Tony’s enterprise we would not have had such interesting and successful careers, and there would not have been an Eye Institute as we know it.

Tony leaves Margaret, his devoted wife of 55 years, their daughter Michelle and son Stephen, and four grandchildren, to whom we extend our sincere condolences.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Written by Peter Ring and Bruce Hadden.

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

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