4th May 2018, Volume 131 Number 1474

Merryn A Jones, Jon Cornwall

Kidney transplant is the best option for the long-term health of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Kidneys may be transplanted either from a deceased donor or a living donor,…

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Summary

Patients who are eligible for living kidney donation find it hard to ask potential living donors for a kidney, and at present they feel relatively unsupported in this difficult task. They would like more targeted assistance, including psychological and social support, to help them when they are looking to recruit donors. A screening tool should be developed that assesses willingness and motivation to pursue LKD, along with assessing health literacy, self-efficacy and emotional wellbeing. The results of the assessment would enable tailored support strategies to be implemented according to unmet needs, leading to a potential increase in the rate of organ donation and transplant.

Abstract

Aim

People needing kidney transplants in New Zealand can receive organs from deceased donors or from a living kidney donor. This project explored issues surrounding donor recruitment, examining the lived experience of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients in order to facilitate improved donor recruitment for ESRD patients.

Method

A qualitative study comprising interviews of ESRD patients in Hawke's Bay, focusing on the factors surrounding approaching family and friends for a kidney. Purposeful sampling and thematic analysis of data was utilised.

Results

Recipients desired more support to facilitate approaching donors, with cultural differences observed between Māori and non-Māori in recruitment expectations. Tailored support could be enabled with development of a screening tool to assess willingness and motivation to accept donation, cultural needs, self-efficacy, communication skills and health literacy. Psychosocial support could help address barriers such as reciprocity concerns.

Conclusion

Recipients desired more support to facilitate approaching donors, with cultural differences observed between Māori and non-Māori in recruitment expectations. Tailored support could be enabled with development of a screening tool to assess willingness and motivation to accept donation, cultural needs, self-efficacy, communication skills and health literacy. Psychosocial support could help address barriers such as reciprocity concerns.

Author Information

Merryn A Jones, Renal Services, Hawke’s Bay DHB, Hastings; Jon Cornwall, Centre for Early Learning in Medicine, Otago Medical School, University of Otago, Dunedin; Institute for Health Professions, Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Winterthur, Zurich, Switzerland.

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank Colin Hutchison, Andrew McNally and Nick Cross, Renal Physicians, for their helpful input to this study. Merryn Jones was the grateful recipient of a scholarship from the McCutchan Trust.

Correspondence

Dr Jon Cornwall, Centre for Early Learning in Medicine, Otago Medical School, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin.

Correspondence Email

jon.cornwall@otago.ac.nz

Competing Interests

Merryn Jones reports a grant from McCutchan Trust Scholarship during the conduct of the study.

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