23rd February 2018, Volume 131 Number 1470

Ibrahim Al-Busaidi, Tania Huria, Suzanne Pitama, Cameron Lacey

Cultural competency education has been integrated in medical schools’ curricula worldwide1 and in New Zealand.2 Effective doctor-patient interaction is one factor associated with favourable health outcomes.3 To optimise both communication…

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Abstract

There has been a steady increase in cultural competency training in medical education programmes worldwide. To provide high-quality culturally competent care and reduce health disparities between Māori and non-Māori in New Zealand, several health models have been devised. The Indigenous Health Framework (IHF), currently taught at the University of Otago, Christchurch undergraduate medical programme, is a tool developed to assist health professionals to broaden their range of clinical assessment and communicate effectively with Māori patients and whānau, thereby improving health outcomes and reducing disparities. The authors of this article present a Māori health case study written from the observations of a trainee intern (first author) using components from the IHF to address health disparities between Māori and non-Māori.

Author Information

Ibrahim S Al-Busaidi, Medical Registrar, Department of General Medicine, Canterbury District Health Board, Christchurch; Tania Huria, Senior Lecturer, Māori /Indigenous Health Institute, University of Otago, Christchurch; Suzanne Pitama, Associate Professor and Associate Dean Māori, Māori/Indigenous Health Institute, University of Otago, Christchurch;
Cameron Lacey, Senior Lecturer, Māori/Indigenous Health Institute, University of Otago, Christchurch.

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank the patient described in this report for giving us written permission to discuss his case. 

Correspondence

Ibrahim S Al-Busaidi, Medical Registrar, Department of General Medicine, Canterbury District Health Board, Christchurch.

Correspondence Email

ibrahim.al-busaidi@cdhb.health.nz

Competing Interests

Nil.

References

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