19th January 2018, Volume 131 Number 1468

Lloyd Roffe, Scott Pearson, Johnathan Sharr, Michael Ardagh

For the young and those young at heart, trampolining is an enjoyable pastime. It has benefits for children; improving fitness, balance and motor performance.1 Trampoline parks have become a worldwide…

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Summary

Christchurch saw a significant increase in trampoline-related injuries after the opening of two new parks. These injuries involved an older group of children, affected predominantly the lower limbs and were more severe than those reported from the use of domestic trampolines. Consistent with past research, the trampoline park allowing multiple users had a higher proportion of presentations and more injuries requiring operative intervention.

Abstract

Aim

To analyse trampoline-related injuries suffered after the opening of two new trampoline parks in Christchurch.

Method

Data was collected from three 90-day periods. All trampoline-related injuries were collected from electronic documentation and coding. Those injured after both arenas opened were contacted and a semi-structured interview performed.

Results

In the 90 days after both parks opened there were 602 claims for trampoline-related injuries with 106 hospital presentations (55% male). This was a significant increase (p<0.01) from one year earlier (333 claims, 37 hospital presentations) and the 90 days prior to their opening (201 claims, 15 hospital presentations). Most injuries affected an older group of children, aged between 10–14 years (26%, n=28), compared to the other two periods (p<0.01). There was also a greater proportion of lower-limb injuries (52%, n=55) compared to the other two periods (p<0.01). Thirty-six required hospital admission, with 29 operations and an average length of stay of 2.11 days. One trampoline park allowed two or more people to use the same trampoline at the same time, and had over twice as many presentations (33%, n=35) than the other trampoline park (14%, n=15).

Conclusion

Christchurch saw a significant increase in trampoline-related injuries after the opening of two new parks. These injuries involved an older group of children, affected predominantly the lower limbs and were more severe than those reported from the use of domestic trampolines. Consistent with past research, the trampoline park allowing multiple users had a higher proportion of presentations and more injuries requiring operative intervention.

Author Information

Lloyd Roffe, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Canterbury District Health Board, Christchurch; Scott Pearson, Emergency Medicine, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch; Johnathan Sharr, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine Canterbury District Health Board, Christchurch; Michael Ardagh, Emergency Department, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch.

Correspondence

Dr Scott Pearson, Department of Emergency Medicine, Canterbury District Health Board, 2 Riccarton Avenue, Christchurch 8011.

Correspondence Email

scott.pearson@cdhb.health.nz

Competing Interests

Nil.

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