1st December 2017, Volume 130 Number 1466

Venkatesh Vaidyanathan, Nishi Karunasinghe, Vetrivhel Krishnamurthy, Chi Hsiu-Juei Kao, Vijay Naidu, Radha Pallati, Alice Wang, Khanh Tran, Prasanna Kallingappa, Anower Jabed, Syed M Shahid, Jonathan Masters, Clare Wall, Ajit Narayanan, Lynnette R Ferguson

Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most significant non-skin cancer male health concerns worldwide,1 with at least one in six PCa patients estimated at being at risk of developing…

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Abstract

Prostate cancer is an important health burden to the healthcare system of any country. However, with the current prostate-specific antigen biomarker having low predictive value even for diagnostic purposes, the challenge is still open to tackle this chronic disease. There have been a number of studies which have indicated and encouraged a multi-directional approach to combat this disease. We have been carrying out a multi-directional approach in order to identify certain New Zealand-specific factors which may be drivers for this cancer and its aggressive forms. These will be explained in further detail in this research letter.

Author Information

Venkatesh Vaidyanathan, Teaching Assistant, Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology, FM & HS, University of Auckland, Auckland; Nishi Karunasinghe, Research Fellow, Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, Auckland; Vetrivhel Krishnamurthy, Post-Graduate student, University of Auckland, Auckland; Chi Hsiu-Juei Kao, PhD student, Discipline of Nutrition and Dietetics, FM & HS, University of Auckland, Auckland; Vijay Naidu, PhD student, School of Engineering, Computer and Mathematical Sciences, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland; Radha Pallati, Laboratory Technician, Auckland Clinical Studies, Auckland; Alice Wang, FM & HS, University of Auckland, Auckland;
Khanh Tran, PhD student, Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology, FM & HS, University of Auckland, Auckland; Prasanna Kallingappa, Research Fellow, Vernon Jenson Unit, FM & HS, University of Auckland, Auckland; Anower Jabed, Research Fellow, Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology, FM & HS, University of Auckland, Auckland; Syed M Shahid, Postdoctoral Academic Visitor, FM & HS, University of Auckland, Auckland; Jonathan Masters, Urologist, Urology Department, Auckland District Health Board, Auckland; Clare Wall, Head of Department, Discipline of Nutrition and Dietetics, FM & HS, University of Auckland, Auckland; Ajit Narayanan, Head of the Research, School of Engineering, Computer and Mathematical Sciences, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland; Lynnette R Ferguson, Emeritus Professor, University of Auckland, Auckland.

Correspondence

Dr Venkatesh Vaidyanathan, Teaching Assistant, Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology, FM & HS, University of Auckland, Auckland 1023.

Correspondence Email

v.vaidyanathan@auckland.ac.nz

Competing Interests

Nil.

References

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