10th November 2017, Volume 130 Number 1465

Richard Jaine, Richard Edwards, Jude Ball, Dalice Sim, George Thomson, R Beaglehole

There is convincing evidence that children exposed to secondhand smoke (SHS) are at increased risk of respiratory tract infections, asthma exacerbations, sudden unexplained death in infancy (SUDI) and bacterial meningitis.1…

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Author Information

Richard Jaine, Senior Lecturer, Department of Public Health, University of Otago, Wellington;
Richard Edwards, Professor, Department of Public Health, University of Otago, Wellington;
Jude Ball, Research Fellow, Department of Public Health, University of Otago, Wellington; 
Dalice Sim, Senior Research Fellow/Biostatistician, Dean’s Department, University of Otago, Wellington; George Thomson, Research Associate Professor, Department of Public Health, University of Otago, Wellington; Robert Beaglehole, Professor, University of Auckland, Auckland.

Acknowledgements

Greg Martin from Health Promotion Agency for providing the latest Health and Lifestyles survey data.

Correspondence

Richard Jaine, Senior Lecturer, Department of Public Health, University of Otago, Wellington.

Correspondence Email

richard.jaine@otago.ac.nz

Competing Interests

Nil.

References

  1. Royal College of Physicians. Passive smoking and children. A report by the Tobacco Advisory Group. London: Royal College of Physicians, 2010.
  2. Hodgkin R, Newell P. Implementation handbook for the convention on the rights of the child. 3rd edn. Geneva: UNICEF, 2007.
  3. New Zealand Parliament. Petition 2014/27 of Bridget Rowse on behalf of Patu Puauahi Smokefree Northland: Report of the Health Committee. Wellington: New Zealand Parliament, 2016.
  4. New Zealand Parliament. Government response to report of the Health Committee on Petition 2014/27 of Bridget Rowse on behalf of Patu Puauahi Smokefree Northland. Wellington: New Zealand Parliament, 2017.
  5. Edwards R, Sim D, Ball J, et al. Surveys shows exposure to smoking in cars among Year 10 children is not decreasing: time for the Government to act. N Z Med J. 2017; 130;56–8.
  6. Shier H, Train PÁ. Pathways to participation: openings, opportunities and obligations: a new model for enhancing children’s participation in decision-making, in line with Article 12.1 of the United Nations convention on the rights of the child. Child Soc 2001; 15:107–17.
  7. Action on Smoking and Health. 2014 ASH Year 10 Snapshot Survey: Information and methodology. Auckland: Action on Smoking and Health; 2014.
  8. Health Protection Agency. Young people’s opinion on extending smoking bans to cars and outdoor places where young people go. In Fact. Health Protection Agency, Wellington, 2013. http://www.hpa.org.nz/sites/default/files/2012%20YIS%20Young%20Peoples%20opinion%20on%20extending%20smoking%20bans%20FA%20%282%29.pdf. Accessed 9 June 2017
  9. al-Delaimy W, Luo D, Woodward A, Howden-Chapman P. Smoking hygiene: a study of attitudes to passive smoking. N Z Med J. 1999; 112:33–6.
  10. Wilson N, Blakely T, Edwards R, et al. Support by New Zealand smokers for new types of smokefree areas: national survey data. N Z Med J. 2009; 122(1303):80–9.
  11. Trappitt R, Li J, Tu D. Acceptability of smoking around other people – Health and Lifestyles Survey 2008 [In Fact]. Wellington: Health Sponsorship Council, 2011. www.hsc.org.nz/researchpublications.html. Accessed 9 June 2017
  12. Li J, Newcombe R. Acceptability of extended smokefree areas and smokefree cars. [In Fact]. Wellington: Health Promotion Agency Research and Evaluation Unit, 2013.
  13. Li J, Nelson S, Newcombe R, Walton D. Smoking in cars: knowledge, behaviours and support for smokefree cars legislation among New Zealand smokers and recent quitters. N Z Med J. 2016; 129:46–58.

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