12th May 2017, Volume 130 Number 1455

Richard Carroll, Alana Gould, Joe Feltham, Simon Harper

Mr B (63m) presented with resistant hypertension, diagnosed aged 46, associated with significant hypokalaemia over the past four years. He remained hypertensive (150/90mmHg) despite controlled release metoprolol 47.5mg, felodipine 10mg,…

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Abstract

Primary hyperaldosteronism is a common cause of hypertension in the adult population. We report a case of histologically and biochemically confirmed hyperaldosteronism related to an adrenal adenoma, where initial screening and biochemical tests were potentially misleading. The case highlights the importance of clinical suspicion in the current diagnostic approach to primary hyperaldosteronism.

Author Information

Richard Carroll, Endocrine, Diabetes and Research Centre, Wellington Regional Hospital, Wellington; Alana Gould, Endocrine, Diabetes and Research Centre, Wellington Regional Hospital, Wellington; Joe Feltham, Department of Radiology, Wellington Regional Hospital, Wellington; Simon Harper, Department of Surgery, Wellington Regional Hospital, Newtown, Wellington.

Correspondence

Dr Richard Carroll, Endocrine, Diabetes and Research Centre, Wellington Regional Hospital, Riddiford Street, Newtown, Wellington 6021.

Correspondence Email

richard.carroll@ccdhb.org.nz

Competing Interests

Nil.

References

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