12th May 2017, Volume 130 Number 1455

Ian Civil, Siobhan Isles

Physical injuries represent a significant burden to society, the healthcare system and the patient. In New Zealand, injury accounts for as much as 8% of total health loss from all…

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Summary

New Zealand is on the cusp of establishing a world-class trauma system. Many of the building blocks are in place with national and regional guidelines in both the pre-hospital and hospital phases of care established. A dedicated clinical workforce is available in all DHBs and national data is available through the Major Trauma Registry. The greatest threat to achieving high-quality trauma care in New Zealand at this point is governance stability rather than clinical variability. Now is the time to lock the trauma system into a framework not subject to political or bureaucratic whims.

Abstract

New Zealand is on the cusp of establishing a world-class trauma system. Many of the building blocks are in place with national and regional guidelines in both the pre-hospital and hospital phases of care established. A dedicated clinical workforce is available in all DHBs and national data available through the Major Trauma Registry. The greatest threat to achieving high-quality trauma care in New Zealand at this point is governance stability rather than clinical variability. Now is the time to lock the trauma system into a framework not subject to political or bureaucratic whims.

Author Information

Ian Civil, Clinical Lead, Major Trauma National Clinical Network; Siobhan Isles, Progamme Coordinator, Major Trauma National Clinical Network.

Correspondence

Dr Ian Civil, Trauma Services, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 1024.

Correspondence Email

ianc@adhb.govt.nz

Competing Interests

Nil.

References

  1. Ministry of Health and Accident Compensation Corporation. 2013. Injury-related Health Loss: A report from the New Zealand Burden of Diseases, Injuries and Risk Factors Study 2006–2016. Wellington: Ministry of Health. ISBN 978-0-478-40296-4
  2. Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, NZ Trauma Committee. Guidelines for a structured approach to the provision of optimal trauma care. RACS. May 2012. http://www.surgeons.org/media/17053260/doc_2012-09-14_guidelines_for_a_structured_approach_to_the_provision_of_optimal_trauma_care.pdf Accessed 31 Jan 2017
  3. Civil I. Trauma system coordination in New Zealand: a year of progress. N Z Med J. 1995; 996(108):93–94.
  4. Civil I. Trauma: still a problem in New Zealand. N Z Med J. 2004 (1201). http://www.nzma.org.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0008/17954/Vol-117-No-1201-10-September-2004.pdf
  5. Civil I. A national trauma network: now or never for NZ. N Z Med J. 2010 (1316). http://www.nzma.org.nz/journal/read-the-journal/all-issues/2010-2019/2010/vol-123-no-1316/editorial-civil
  6. Major Trauma National Clinical Network. Annual Report 2015–2016. http://media.wix.com/ugd/bbebfb_28543150b87246fd959b10af996bb1ac.pdf Accessed 31 January 2017.

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