12th May 2017, Volume 130 Number 1455

Tess Brian, Brandon Adams

The 2011 “Consensus statement on the role of the doctor in New Zealand” expresses a commitment to evidence-based medicine, scholarship, teaching, collaboration and communication.1 This commitment may be demonstrated through…

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Summary

The New Zealand Medical Association commits the New Zealand doctor to evidence-based medicine, scholarship, teaching, collaboration and communication. To assess this commitment, one measure, contribution to the peer-reviewed literature, was examined for one group of New Zealand doctors: plastic surgeons. Based on this metric, as a group, but with exceptions and less so in later practice, New Zealand plastic surgeons would seem to demonstrate this commitment.

Abstract

Aim

The New Zealand Medical Association commits the New Zealand doctor to evidence-based medicine, scholarship, teaching, collaboration and communication. To assess this commitment, one measure, contribution to the peer-reviewed literature, was examined for one group of New Zealand doctors: plastic surgeons.

Method

Plastic surgeons with a current practising certificate were identified on the New Zealand medical register (April 2016). Scopus database was searched for publications by each.

Results

Sixty-five surgeons authored 541 unique items in 134 journals, generating 8,047 citations. Between medical graduation and specialty qualification, a mean 1.8 items were published per practitioner (range 0–11). Twenty-three practitioners (35.4%) did not publish during this time. Between specialty qualification and the end of 2015, mean number of items published per surgeon was 7.3 (range 0–97). Thirteen (20.0%) surgeons had not published since specialist qualification. The general trend was for surgeons to become less productive with increasing time in practice. Mean surgeon h-index was 4.4 (range 0–26). Four surgeons (6.2%) had not published at any time.

Conclusion

As a group, but with exceptions and less so in later practice, New Zealand plastic surgeons would seem to demonstrate commitment to evidence-based medicine, scholarship, teaching, collaboration and communication expected of a New Zealand doctor, as evidenced by peer-review publication.

Author Information

Tess Brian, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Waikato Hospital, Hamilton; Brandon Adams, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Waikato Hospital, Hamilton.

Correspondence

Dr Tess Brian, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Waikato Hospital, Selwyn Street and Pembroke Street, Hamilton 3204.

Correspondence Email

tessbrian0@gmail.com

Competing Interests

Nil.

References

  1. New Zealand Medical Association. NZMA Position Statement—Consensus statement on the role of the doctor in New Zealand. Wellington. 2011 (http://www.nzma.org.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0006/16980/Consensus-statement-on-the-role-of-the-doctor-in-New-Zealand-November-2011.pdf) (accessed 6 November 2016).
  2. Schein M, Farndon JR, Fingerhut A. Why should a surgeon publish? Br J Surg 2000; 87:3–5.

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