27th January 2017, Volume 130 Number 1449

Prasad Nishtala, Henry Ndukwe, Te-yuan Chyou, Mohammed Salahudeen, Sujita Narayan

Pharmacoepidemiology is an evolving area of research and was recognised as a distinct discipline in the early to mid-1980’s. An interface between clinical epidemiology and pharmacology, pharmacoepidemiology benefits from methodology…

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Summary

Pharmacoepidemiology is a combination of the sciences involved in epidemiology and pharmacology. In New Zealand there have been recent advances in pharmacoepidemiology to examine medicine use and observe adverse drug events for individuals who are often not included in trials such as older people. This paper attempts to describe the past, present and future of pharmacoepidemiology in New Zealand, with a particular focus on medicine use and safety.

Abstract

Pharmacoepidemiology is an eclectic blend of epidemiology, clinical pharmacology and biostatistics. In New Zealand there have been recent advances in pharmacoepidemiology to examine drug utilisation, monitor adverse drug events and complement pharmacovigilance. This paper attempts to describe the past, present and future of pharmacoepidemiology, particularly in the area of translational research with a particular focus on medicine use and safety. New Zealand is well-positioned globally to make significant contributions to the knowledge base of drug safety in real-world settings.

Author Information

Prasad Nishtala, School of Pharmacy, University of Otago, Dunedin; Henry Ndukwe, School of Pharmacy, University of Otago, Dunedin; Te-yuan Chyou, School of Pharmacy, University of Otago, Dunedin; Mohammed Salahudeen, School of Pharmacy, University of Otago, Dunedin; Sujita Narayan, School of Pharmacy, University of Otago, Dunedin.

Correspondence

Dr Prasad Nishtala, School of Pharmacy, University of Otago, Dunedin.

Correspondence Email

prasad.nishtala@otago.ac.nz

Competing Interests

Nil.

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